"At first, they were the experts and we were still just learning. But then the students went on to outplay their professors. "

    Alexander Yakushev



Impressions


 

Team Czechoslovakia: Facts and Stats

  International Tournaments:

Czechoslovakia: WC Gold in 1947, 1949, 1972, 1976, 1977, 1985; Olympics Gold in 1998
Czechia: WC Gold in 1996, 1999, 2000, 2001
Slovakia: WC Gold in 2002

  Czechoslovakia vs. Team Canada 1972:

Game Summary | Players Info:
Goalies & Defense
| Forwards

 

 
   USSR vs CSSR: 1968-1978
Score | Location | Year G

USSR 4 CSSR 5, Grenoble'68

OG

USSR 0 CSSR 2, Stockholm'69

WC

USSR 3 CSSR 4, Stockholm'69

WC

USSR 8 CSSR 2, Moscow'69

IC

USSR 3 CSSR 1, Stockholm'70

WC

USSR 5 CSSR 2, Stockholm'70

WC

USSR 5 CSSR 7, Prague'74

EG

USSR 2 CSSR 5, Pardubice'70

EG

USSR 6 CSSR 0, Ostrava'70

EG

USSR 2 CSSR 3, Geneva'71

WC

USSR 2 CSSR 5, Geneva'71

WC

USSR 5 CSSR 2, Moscow'71

IC

USSR 1 CSSR 3, Moscow'71

EG

USSR 5 CSSR 2, Sapporo'72

OG

USSR 3 CSSR 3, Prague'72

WC

USSR 2 CSSR 3, Prague'72

WC

USSR 8 CSSR 4, Moscow'72

IC

USSR 3 CSSR 2, Moscow'73

WC

USSR 4 CSSR 2, Moscow'73

WC

USSR 7 CSSR 1, Moscow'73

IC

USSR 5 CSSR 7, Prague'74

EG

USSR 4 CSSR 3, Prague'74

EG

USSR 6 CSSR 3, Moscow '74

IC

USSR 3 CSSR 3, Moscow'74

IC

USSR 3 CSSR 4, Moscow'74

IC

USSR 2 CSSR 7, Helsinki'74

WC

USSR 3 CSSR 1, Helsinki'74

WC

USSR 1 CSSR 6, Prague'75

IC

USSR 1 CSSR 6, Prague'75

IC

USSR 2 CSSR 4, Prague'75

IC

USSR 3 CSSR 9, Prague'75

IC

USSR 5 CSSR 2, Germany'75

WC

USSR 4 CSSR 1, Germany'75

WC

USSR 5 CSSR 3, Prague'75

EG

USSR 4 CSSR 1, Prague'75

EG

USSR 3 CSSR 2, Moscow'75

IC

USSR 4 CSSR 3, Innsbruck'76

OG

USSR 2 CSSR 3, Katowice'76

WC

USSR 3 CSSR 3, Katowice'76

WC

USSR 3 CSSR 5, Montreal'76

CC

USSR 3 CSSR 5, Prague'76

EG

USSR 6 CSSR 3, Prague'76

EG

USSR 3 CSSR 2, Moscow'76

IC

USSR 6 CSSR 1, Austria'77

WC

USSR 3 CSSR 4, Austria'77

WC

USSR 4 CSSR 5, Prague'77

RP

USSR 3 CSSR 8, Moscow'77

IC

USSR 4 CSSR 6, Prague'78

WC

USSR 3 CSSR 1, Prague'78

WC

USSR 8 CSSR 2, Bratislava'78

RP

USSR 5 CSSR 4, Pardubice'78

RP

USSR 5 CSSR 4, Prague'78

RP

USSR 3 CSSR 3, Moscow'78

IC

Total: 53 games

-

 

GP

W

L

T

GF

GA

USSR

53

27

22

4

198

182

CSSR

53

22

27

4

182

198

Team Czechoslovakia: Do Toho
Hockey fans cheer their favorites with "Go Canada" in Canada, "Heja Tre Kronor" in Sweden and "Shaibu Shaibu" in Russia. Czechs and Slovaks use the "Do Toho" hockey chants. Most of these expressions make no sense outside the hockey world.

Whenever I look at the Czechoslovakian line-up of the 1970s, I get a little nostalgic. Strangely enough, I was a big fan of their team of that time. Three decades later, I still think that it was one of the classiest hockey teams ever. Their unprecedented team spirit, intelligent game schema and talent pool packed with outstanding players were always a subject of my admiration. In the 1970s, Czechoslovakia dared to challenge the unbeatable Soviet hockey superpower. Although the harvest of gold medals in the top hockey tournament of that time belongs to the Russians, their face-to-face games statistics show that it was a battle of equals with an almost marginal advantage of Team USSR.

Historically, Czechoslovakia was one of the most successful European hockey teams since the beginning of the 20th century. In fact, Czech specialists mentored hockey pioneers in Russia after World War II. The students learned the craft faster than it was expected. In 1954, the Soviets celebrated their WC debut in Stockholm with the Gold Medals. In the 1960s, USSR was virtually unstoppable in their gold medal run at the WCs and the Olympics.

In the 1970s, the USSR vs. CSSR hockey rivalry reached its peak. Part of this rivalry was obviously related strictly to hockey. The other part had nothing to do with the on-ice action. The 1968 Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia remains the most tragic moment in the history of Russian-Czechoslovakian relationships. The shameful order to send tanks to Prague came from politicians in Kremlin who neither had an idea nor seemed to care about the results of this outrageous decision. As usual with dumb political decisions, politicians made them and the nations have to deal with the consequences. None of the people responsible for the invasion are around anymore but the 1968 shadow is still in memory.

The war-like take-no-prisoners nature of these games was never officially acknowledged neither by the Soviet media nor by the hockey federation. In fact, the Soviet blueliner Alexander Gusev was close to life suspension from hockey for the fight instigated by his Czech opponent at the Izvestia Cup.

I don't believe that hatred produces anything but destruction and another wave of hatred. Ironically, in hockey, the rivalry between the two nations produced unforgettable moments of hockey action and heroics. The Soviets mostly dominated with powerful attacks and the Czechs built their game plan on quick counterattacks and solid defense play. Regardless of the tournament they played, each game was treated by both teams as a play-off type of combat. One could never predict the results of competition between these two distinct styles. The only thing that was predictable was the highest game level.

Jagr and Hasek didn't invent Czech hockey but continued the traditions established by the elite players of earlier generations including Martinec and Holecek, Pospisil and the Holik Brothers of the 1970s. In some way, it was the "golden age" of Czech hockey.